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In the fast-paced world of emergency medicine, healthcare professionals are often viewed as unsung heroes, tirelessly working to save lives in high-stress situations. However, behind the scenes, a silent struggle persists—one that is often overlooked and stigmatized. Physician addiction is a complex issue that demands our attention and understanding.

Suzette Iverson, PA-C
By Suzette Iverson, PA-C
on February 12, 2024

The recent explosion of GLP-1 agonists has led to an increase in the number of patients asking about medication for weight loss. Although you may be happy to encourage patients to achieve their weight loss goals, you may also wonder about the best ways in which to support them. 

By Maureen McCaffrey, PA-C
on February 09, 2024

Does anyone else find themselves relying heavily on your EMR system's medication interaction checker when prescribing medications or considering medication management? If you're like me, it’s a vital part of my workflow. 

Jen Janocha, PA-C
By Jen Janocha, PA-C
on February 08, 2024

Talipes equinovarus, the Latin term for clubfoot, is the most prevalent congenital musculoskeletal anomaly worldwide, affecting approximately 1 in 1,000 newborns. A majority of clubfoot burden impacts low and middle-income countries, underscoring the global health disparities in access to early intervention. If left untreated, this condition can lead to significant deformities, emphasizing the critical role pediatricians play in timely diagnosis, management, and treatment of clubfoot. 

Geoff Comp, DO
By Geoff Comp, DO
on February 06, 2024

As an emergency medicine resident, preparing for the ABEM In-Training Exam (ITE) is a pivotal phase in your medical journey. This high-stakes exam not only assesses your knowledge and readiness for the next steps in your career but also lays the groundwork for your lifelong practice in emergency medicine. While there is no “passing” score for the ITE, studies and empirical data have shown a strong correlation between test results and performance on the ABEM written board exam. Physicians with higher ITE scores have a higher likelihood of passing the ABEM Qualifying Exam than those with lower scores. The ITE helps identify areas of weakness early in your residency training. Addressing these areas promptly can significantly improve your chances of passing the board exam on the first attempt.

Suzette Iverson, PA-C
By Suzette Iverson, PA-C
on February 05, 2024

Have you ever been asked about ashwagandha? Or had a patient who prefers valerian root over trazodone for sleep? In the ever-evolving landscape of healthcare, patients frequently turn to dietary supplement use to address a variety of health concerns. As healthcare professionals, it is our responsibility to guide our patients with evidence-based recommendations while also supporting their holistic well-being. However, most of us have had little or no training on the risks and benefits of the various dietary and herbal supplements on the market.

Katie Iverson, PA-C
By Katie Iverson, PA-C
on February 05, 2024

As we celebrate American Heart Month, let’s take some time to review all the different ways our heart valves can break and how they present in the clinical setting. Ok, “break” is dramatic, but it’s February, when all sorts of heart puns are forgiven, right? ❤️

Suzette Iverson, PA-C
By Suzette Iverson, PA-C
on January 29, 2024

Have you ever wondered what goes on behind the scenes at a medical education company? Hippo Education makes video, audio, and written medical education, and we make a lot of it! If you wonder what makes us different, the answer, in short, is: practicing clinicians, peer review, and a crazy fun team.

Matt Zeitler, MD
By Matt Zeitler, MD
on January 09, 2024

Shave and punch biopsies are essential procedures for those who manage skin conditions and skin diseases. They can provide helpful information about undiagnosed skin lesions such as neoplasms, bullous disorders, keratoses, or dysplastic nevi. A diagnostic biopsy can also be the definitive treatment for malignant, irritated, or precancerous lesions. There's a right and a wrong way to do things, though. Here are our top 10 tips to prevent errors during skin biopsies.

Kelly Heidepriem, MD
By Kelly Heidepriem, MD
on January 08, 2024

The holidays may be over, but ‘tis still the season for slip and falls on the ice that result in tailbone and coccyx area injuries. Coccyx injuries are a common chief complaint in urgent care during this wintery, icy time of year. Classic coccydynia (aka coccyx pain) is worse when sitting and can worsen when rising from a seated position. At first glance, this seems like a straightforward chief complaint, but it lends itself to opportunities for a more nuanced discussion with patients.

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Rob Orman, MD
By Rob Orman, MD
on January 08, 2024

Conversations in the emergency department can be challenging, especially when we need to say "no" to patient requests. Let’s explore why this is difficult, the importance of having a script, and a framework for handling these conversations.

Katy Vogelaar, FNP-C
By Katy Vogelaar, FNP-C
on January 03, 2024

As we usher in a new year, we find ourselves at the forefront of healthcare, continuously providing vital services and compassionate care to those in need. Amidst the challenges of the ever-evolving healthcare landscape, we must remember that we, too, deserve care and attention – not just for the sake of our well-being but also for the benefit of those we serve. According to an article published by the Journal of General Internal Medicine, nearly half of healthcare professionals are burned out. Burnout among healthcare providers has been shown to negatively impact patient safety, quality of care, and patient satisfaction. This new year presents a golden opportunity for us to prioritize self-care, fostering a healthier and more resilient healthcare workforce.

By Vicky Pittman, PA-C
By By Vicky Pittman, PA-C
on December 11, 2023

Tens of millions of people in the United States have trouble accessing the healthcare services they need. Whether for lack of housing, insurance, or transportation or because of language and literacy barriers, there are so many reasons why people who need medical care may not be able to reach us. Or when they do, we may not always know how to help. As front-line clinicians, we can play a role in helping our vulnerable community members. This is especially true for those of us working in urgent care. 

Jen Janocha, PA-C
By Jen Janocha, PA-C
on December 11, 2023

In this month’s episode of Peds RAP, we discuss the case of a two-year-old child that presented with a history of constipation and abdominal distention.  The journey to diagnosis uncovered a complex medical condition - Hirschsprung’s Disease.

Katie Iverson, PA-C
By Katie Iverson, PA-C
on December 06, 2023

As December is Safe Toys and Gifts Awareness Month, now is the perfect time to emphasize the importance of toy safety to parents and caregivers.

Toys bring joy and learning opportunities to children, but they can also pose serious health risks. According to the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission’s (CPSC) report on Toy Related Deaths and Injuries in 2022, there were 11 deaths in children under age 14 related to toys.

There were also 209,500 emergency department visits due to toy injuries in those under age 14, with 38% of those injured being young children under age 4. Many toys can cause minor scrapes or cuts and according to the U.S. CPSC report, 41% of the ER visits due to toy injury were for lacerations or bruising in 2022.

Sarah Walsh, PA-C
By Sarah Walsh, PA-C
on December 05, 2023

Hundreds of thousands of people in the U.S. experience homelessness, and those individuals face unique barriers when they come in to see us for medical care. Learning to ask the right questions, while using a trauma-informed approach, can help us better treat our patients. One tool to remember: HOUSED BEDS.

In the dynamic world of Emergency Medicine, staying up-to-date with the latest clinical guidelines is essential to providing the best possible care for our patients.

The American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) has recently released updated guidelines that directly impact our practice in the management of ischemic stroke care, suspected appendicitis, mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in adults, and acute heart failure syndromes.

With this update, ACEP is collating the results of recent articles, plus providing expert synopsis and commentary in an effort to drive good patient care forward on some really important topics.  Let’s explore these updates and their implications for emergency providers.

Micaela Bowers, MD
By Micaela Bowers, MD
on November 30, 2023

Screen Shot 2023-11-30 at 4.54.17 PM

Ah, pneumonia – the not-so-welcome guest that always seems to overstay its welcome. But what happens when pneumonia lingers? Do we whip out the trusty X-ray machine for a follow-up, or do we cross our fingers and hope for the best? Today, we're diving into the mysterious waters of follow-up imaging after pneumonia. 

Katie Iverson, PA-C
By Katie Iverson, PA-C
on November 14, 2023

As clinicians practicing acute care medicine, we’re tasked with treating a wide variety of patients.

And no matter how thorough our didactic education or clinical skills training, many of the tools we use in acute care medicine are learned on the job.

And there’s no better example of this than plain films interpretation. Unfortunately, this leads to wide variances in both imaging study experience and imaging interpretation accuracy amongst providers. 

 

Katie Iverson, PA-C
By Katie Iverson, PA-C
on November 03, 2023

One of the biggest challenges for any PA moving to another state is the need for a new state license. This is especially true for active-duty PA military spouses due to their frequent moves. This uprooting not only personally affects couples and families, but also the patients, clinical teams, hospital systems, and communities due to turnover and loss of clinicians in the workforce as these PAs relocate. 

By Vicky Pittman, PA-C
By By Vicky Pittman, PA-C
on November 03, 2023

Consider this. You’re working your next shift and it’s a busy one. The waiting room is full and you haven’t even had a chance to eat lunch.

While trying to disposition that patient with hematuria and back pain, you quickly glance at their CT scan and then review the radiologist’s read. Boom, kidney stones, just like you thought.  But, as you continue to scroll through the entire reading you come across the dreaded incidental finding of a pulmonary nodule. What do you typically do with this information? 

Jen Janocha
By Jen Janocha
on November 03, 2023

The last quarter of 2023 MOCA-Peds is upon us!  This month on Peds RAP,  we cover two more MOCA topics to help you ace those questions. 

Katy Vogelaar, NP
By Katy Vogelaar, NP
on November 02, 2023

We’ve all been there; you look at your schedule and see a patient with a chief complaint of “dizziness.” Cue the sense of dread! 

EM PAs are increasingly becoming a critical part of the house of medicine. Last month, we  explored how the EM PA profession evolved and what it takes to become an EM PA. This month, we dive into the diverse settings an EM PA can work in and what that looks like.  

The ABEM Qualifying Exam is coming up: October 30 – November 4, 2023. Are you ready? Preparation requires discipline, effective study strategies, and a comprehensive understanding of the material. We compiled a list of 7 study tips for the ABEM qualifying exam:

Right now, you’re likely providing more mental healthcare to your patients in your outpatient clinics than ever before. 

By The Hippo EM Team
on October 05, 2023

 Andy Little, DO and Zack Repanshek, MD

Jen Swisher, PA-C
By Jen Swisher, PA-C
on October 04, 2023

Writing about a day in the life of an emergency medicine PA only paints a small picture of what it truly takes to become an EM PA.  A “typical” workday will look entirely different for every PA due to the nuances of the ED setting and the part of the ED a PA is assigned to.  So, our goal here is to paint a full picture of the many facets of working as a PA in emergency medicine and to demonstrate what makes us an integral part of the team.

Before we dive into what it looks like to work as an EM PA, let’s explore how the profession evolved in the first place - and what it takes to get into this field.

Hippo Urgent Care RAP Team
By Hippo Urgent Care RAP Team
on October 03, 2023

In the fast-paced world of urgent care, PAs are indispensable. This PA Week, we highlight the remarkable opportunities for professional growth and development for PAs within the urgent care space, both inside and outside the exam room.

Neda Frayha, MD
By Neda Frayha, MD
on October 02, 2023

Breast cancer screening can be complicated; sometimes it’s more than just a mammogram. For example, when a screening mammogram report says a person has dense breasts, what does that really mean? Why is it important, and what should we do about it?

Kelly Heidepriem, MD
By Kelly Heidepriem, MD
on September 13, 2023

As clinicians it’s critical that we understand the drugs our patients are using and can identify their side effects, but it can be tough to keep up.

An emerging threat across the country is the use of xylazine, or “tranq.” Xylazine is an animal sedative, muscle relaxant and analgesic with a potent central nervous system depressant effect in humans. This tranquilizer is frequently added to various drug mixtures sold on the street. Tranq can be found across the U.S. – the Drug Enforcement Administration  reports finding it in 48/50 states — and last year almost one quarter of the fentanyl the DEA seized contained xylazine.

Hippo Urgent Care RAP Team
By Hippo Urgent Care RAP Team
on September 11, 2023

Can you be a good steward of antibiotics and maintain high levels of patient satisfaction? It depends! 

As we move into cold and flu season, we know the number of patient antibiotic requests  will be on the rise. 

We all know the  importance of antibiotic stewardship and the impact of inappropriate antibiotic use. We also know the significance of patient satisfaction, especially in urgent care medicine. This begs the question: Can you be both a good steward of antibiotics and maintain a high level of patient satisfaction? 

We recently asked our Instagram followers whether or not they felt like antibiotic prescribing was linked to patient satisfaction. Here’s what they said:

By Maureen McCaffrey, PA-C
on September 08, 2023

Treating acute pain is a challenge we face during every urgent care shift. We’re all aware of the devastation that the opioid crisis has had on millions of people worldwide. And this epidemic - marked by addiction, overdose, and unintended consequences - has highlighted the need for alternative treatments to manage pain.

As clinicians, we regularly encounter patients wanting or expecting opioids to treat their pain. For years, opioids were the go-to option. We’ve since learned that even short-term opioid  prescriptions can lead to tolerance, dependence, and addiction, making them a potentially risky choice for pain management.1 However, not all providers are comfortable or possess the knowledge to discuss safer and more effective alternatives to opioid medications.

Katy Vogelaar, NP
By Katy Vogelaar, NP
on September 07, 2023

With Fall comes the start of cold and flu season. Whether you work in a family medicine clinic, urgent care, emergency department, pediatric office, or specialty clinic, you can’t escape the nasty viruses that cause upper respiratory infections and wreak havoc on our immune systems

Jen Swisher, PA-C
By Jen Swisher, PA-C
on September 06, 2023

If you’re on the frontlines of the emergency department, you’ve probably noticed the uptick in respiratory infections and viruses in the early kick-off to 2023’s respiratory season.

As we brace for fall and winter, it looks like we’ll have additional tools in our arsenal to decrease complications and hospitalizations from respiratory syncytial virus (RSV): adult vaccines and a monoclonal antibody for all infants.

Three different vaccines will be available this season to combat viral respiratory symptoms and threats: 

  • An updated Covid booster 
  • The annual influenza vaccines
  • Two adult RSV vaccines


Additionally, there will be another RSV monoclonal antibody option for our tiniest patients. Phase 3 trials and regulatory approval are underway for maternal vaccines and passive immunity protection for newborns.

Let’s dive into these tools now.

Katy Vogelaar
By Katy Vogelaar
on August 15, 2023

In our May blog post, we introduced you to the CARE acronym (Common, Atypical, Rare, Emergent) to help students formulate differential diagnosis. Over the next few months, we want to apply the CARE acronym to some chief complaints. We hope this will be helpful to you as you’re precepting students. Share this blog post and graphics with them during their next shift! 

We are all learning how to be good stewards of prescription opioids which has resulted in a significant downward trend in dispensing rates over the past decade. However, the number of fatal overdoses due to fentanyl continues to rise. ​​

Karen Hovav, MD
By Karen Hovav, MD
on August 09, 2023

Everyone’s buzzing with the news of the DEA’s new opiate training requirement for healthcare providers. That’s right - as of  June 27th, 2023, any physician who applies for DEA renewal needs to certify completion of an 8-hour, one-time training on the treatment and management of patients with opioid or other substance-use disorders. 

By The Peds RAP Team
on August 09, 2023

The countdown to October is on! You’ve already applied for the American Board of Pediatrics General Pediatrics Certifying Exam and are probably in the midst of studying.

Ashley Greer PA-C
By Ashley Greer PA-C
on August 09, 2023
By Ashley Greer PA-C and Vicky Pittman PA-C

 

As clinicians, many of us have been touched personally as well as professionally by the opioid crisis and overdose deaths. According to the CDC, over 107,000 people in the U.S. died of drug overdoses from January 2021-January 2022, and 67% of those deaths involved synthetic opioids such as fentanyl. Fentanyl is especially terrifying because many people who overdose on it may have had no intention of using it at all.

by Michael Baca-Atlas, MD, FASAM, Ashley Greer, PA-C, and Vicky Pittman, PA-C

 

As most of us are now aware, the US Department of Justice created a new opioid-related training requirement for DEA-registered providers. This new requirement went into effect June 27, 2023 for those renewing their DEA license.

The requirement is 8 hours of training (CME not specified) regarding opioid use disorder and other substance use disorders. There are two main exceptions to this requirement:

Vicky Pittman, PA-C
By Vicky Pittman, PA-C
on August 07, 2023

It’s August, which means sports physical season is upon us. Organized sports are an important way for children 6 and older to meet the recommended 60 minutes of physical activity per day. However, it’s important for clinicians to use the sports or pre-participation physical examination (PPE) to identify who can safely participate in these activities and who needs further evaluation before they are cleared to participate.  

Jen Swisher, PA-C
By Jen Swisher, PA-C
on July 11, 2023

By Jen Swisher, PA-C and Geoff Comp, DO

Summer is here - and we know all too well that drowning and water-related medical emergencies rise during this time of year.

As emergency medicine providers, we all have one degree of separation from a tragic story of a submersion event. While we’re well-versed in the in-hospital care of a drowning victim, it’s possible that we may also have to play the part of first responder at home, the pool, river, lake, or beachside.

Are you ready to take action outside of the ED? Matt DeLaney, MD and Geoff Comp, DO are.

Neda Frayha, MD
By Neda Frayha, MD
on July 03, 2023

Have you ever heard a doctor from one specialty bash or badmouth another specialty? We have, too. Specialty disrespect is a form of microaggression in the health care community, and it has a real impact on students, residents and our patients. But we have the power to change the culture, and it’s time to address this issue.  

Melissa Orman, MD
By Melissa Orman, MD
on June 08, 2023

That’s a wrap on Essentials of Emergency Medicine 2023! 

Karen Hovav, MD
By Karen Hovav, MD
on June 07, 2023

Chances are, unless you’ve been living on a remote island somewhere, you’ve heard about the obesity guidelines published by the AAP in February of this year. These are the first clinical guidelines on obesity management and treatment in children, and they’re not without controversy! While some have applauded this publication as long-overdue, others worry about overreach and unintended consequences. 

Vicky Pittman, PA-C
By Vicky Pittman, PA-C
on June 06, 2023

In early April, the US Department of Justice sent out an email notifying clinicians of a new opioid-related training requirement for DEA registered-providers. Over the past several weeks, there's been chatter on social media and discussion boards about what this new training is, who needs it, and how to fulfill it. We're here to share that we're working on OUD Decoded: A DEA-Compliant Audio Course and will make it available by July 2023!

Our team dug through the internet (and read through the entire MATE Act 🤓) to deliver you the information below.

Katie Iverson, PA-C
By Katie Iverson, PA-C
on June 05, 2023

Understanding the signs and symptoms of cataracts is essential for accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment planning. Let’s explore the key indicators that can help us as medical providers to identify and address cataracts effectively.

Matt Zeitler, MD
By Matt Zeitler, MD
on June 05, 2023

We know that chronic hepatitis B infection can lead to substantial morbidity and mortality. While there is no cure, antiviral treatment, monitoring, and liver cancer surveillance can improve outcomes for people living with hepatitis B. Additionally, effective preventative hepatitis B vaccines are available.

Until recently, guidelines recommended that only people at high risk of infection be screened for hepatitis B virus (HBV). Under that policy, we missed a lot of people: only an estimated 1 in 3 people in the U.S. with hepatitis B are aware they are infected. 

Vicky Pittman, PA-C
By Vicky Pittman, PA-C
on June 05, 2023

As the role of urgent care clinicians continues to expand in the house of medicine and we take on more responsibilities, it’s our job as clinicians to ask ourselves:

Karen Hovav, MD
By Karen Hovav, MD
on May 05, 2023

When my daughter was diagnosed with PFAPA (Periodic Fever, Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis, and Adenitis) syndrome, I wasn’t surprised.  I myself had suffered from a mysterious recurrent fever in my childhood, and at some point in medical school, I pinpointed PFAPA as the most likely cause. 

But I was surprised to discover just how common it actually is.  Did you know that PFAPA is the most common type of recurrent fever syndrome in children?

Neda Frayha, MD
By Neda Frayha, MD
on May 02, 2023

As primary care clinicians, we play a crucial role in helping our patients make healthier food choices. But with all the contradicting information out there, sifting through nutrition evidence can be daunting.

One diet that has evidence for helping prevent disease and promote better health is a whole-food, plant-based diet.

This diet focuses on eating whole grains, fruits and vegetables that have undergone minimal processing. Studies have shown that this approach is associated with health promotion and disease prevention, and that a plant-based diet is a cost-effective, low-risk intervention that may lower BMI, BP, HgbA1c and cholesterol levels.

As Michael Pollan says in his book In Defense of Food: “Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.”

Katie Iverson, PA-C
By Katie Iverson, PA-C
on April 13, 2023

PA Students, the clinical rotation year is an exciting and challenging time, as you’re finally able to apply all that you’ve learned in the didactic year to real-world patients. On the other hand, this year is also stressful and can feel overwhelming with all the changes and newness.

For over a decade I’ve been on PA faculty, and every year, the start of the clinical year brings up the same emotion in all of my students. I think the proper word for this emotion is “scited,” which was coined by author Glennon Doyle and is the combination of “scared” and “excited.” 

All of my students ask the same questions… “What are my rotations going to be like?” “How do I not look like a doofus on the first day?” “What kind of questions are preceptors going to ask me?” And then, of course, the classic question, “What is going to be on the test?”

My Hippo PA team understands what it is like to feel “scited” about this year, because we’ve lived that experience, and walked hundreds of students through it. 

Here’s my advice:

Vicky Pittman, PA-C
By Vicky Pittman, PA-C
on April 13, 2023

Hippo has been a longtime partner of the Urgent Care Association (UCA), the trade association that represents Urgent Care clinicians and business professionals. We’ve worked together on several projects over the years, and this year we worked on two new projects: Urgent Care MA Bootcamp, a video-based onboarding program for MAs, and “Hippo Live at UCA”, a dedicated clinical track during UCA’s annual convention. While we are pros when it comes to creating video content, this was the Urgent Care team’s first time putting on a live event. And while it was a lot of work, it was a fantastic experience! If you weren’t able to attend live, here is a brief recap:

Matt Zeitler, MD
By Matt Zeitler, MD
on April 10, 2023

Cancer screening is a critical part of primary care practice, and most of us can recite guidelines in our sleep. That said, cancer screening can feel a little tricky in our transgender population, especially when we are still learning to navigate this sensitive topic as a general part of our practice. 

Neda Frayha, MD
By Neda Frayha, MD
on April 10, 2023

When helping primary care patients navigate heart disease prevention, we all know the big interventions to cover: quitting smoking, exercising, and eating a healthy diet with more plant-based foods. But are you also covering these less prominent risk factors?  

Hippo Education
By Hippo Education
on January 13, 2023

As PA-Cs everywhere are starting the 1st quarter of the new PANRE-LA, we know anxiety is high. Five minutes seems like a long time when we are watching our favorite sports team try to come from behind or desperately try to hold on to the lead. But when that PANRE-LA timer starts to tick down, five minutes a question doesn’t seem that long at all. And we know that panic can set in quickly with each passing minute.

Hippo Education
By Hippo Education
on November 10, 2022

What’s the secret sauce that makes Hippo Education’s urgent care products so popular with 150 provider networks and leading to a partnership with the Urgent Care Association?

It all starts with our educational philosophy.

Hippo Education
By Hippo Education
on August 11, 2022

 

Are you deciding if the PANRE-LA is right for you? Have you already signed up for it? Let the PA team at Hippo Education help you feel confident as we all approach these uncharted waters together.

Hippo Education
By Hippo Education
on February 28, 2022

I am very proud of Hippo’s Race and Medicine series and its efforts to foster a rational discussion around an important topic.

Hippo Education
By Hippo Education
on January 24, 2022

After nearly two years, the EM world is more exhausted than ever.

Beyond Burnout: The Dreary State of EM

Hippo Education
By Hippo Education
on December 08, 2021

Our CEO Aaron Bright, MD, sat down to discuss the remarkable way in which Hippo’s giving back where it really counts this holiday season.

Hippo Education
By Hippo Education
on November 22, 2021

In this bonus content of AAPA Primary Care RAP, our hosts Adrian Banning DHSc, MMS, PA-C, DHSc and Kris Maday MS, PA-C, DFAAPA chat with AAPA President Jennifer Orozco, who discusses her journey from being a PA in Chicago to becoming the leader of the AAPA, and even shares her insights into how to balance your own wellbeing while taking care of the wellbeing of others.

Hippo Education
By Hippo Education
on October 19, 2021

Header1Join us for a Q&A with emergency physician/Hippo CEO Aaron Bright as we pick his brain on one of the biggest issues in modern clinical practice.

Hippo Education
By Hippo Education
on October 05, 2021

100513_EEM_1812An Interview with PAs Katie Iverson & Vicky Pittman

Hippo Education
By Hippo Education
on September 01, 2021

And how to crush it your first time

Hippo Education
By Hippo Education
on August 16, 2021

Wellness and Self Care 

Your clinical year will be one like no other that you have ever experienced. Changing rotations every two, four, six or maybe even eight weeks is a lot of change. Some of you will be moving physically to new places for each rotation which adds the extra stress of packing, driving, maybe even flying and settling into new digs right as you start a new rotation. It can be a lot. 

Hippo Education
By Hippo Education
on August 11, 2021

Tips for Post-Graduate Residency

I graduated from PA 17 years ago in 2004 and that year only one of my classmates did a post-graduate residency and it was kind of by mistake. She followed a fiancé far from home, hated her first job, and took a dermatology residency spot out of necessity when her engagement broke up and she had a lease in a city with no job. She ended up loving dermatology and still practices it to this day. Residencies were just not commonplace ‘back then’.

Hippo Education
By Hippo Education
on August 04, 2021

CME Logging and Tips

You’ve passed your PANCE (Congratulations!!!), landed your first job as a PA, and now it’s time to start focusing on maintaining your NCCPA certification. Part of that process is obtaining and logging continuing medical education (CME) credits. When I first graduated, it was hard to keep straight the different types of CME credits. How do I know if an activity counts as Category 1 or 2? What the heck is the difference between Category 1 and Category 2? What records do I need to keep in case I get audited by the NCCPA? Wait, I can get audited...like the IRS audits taxes?! 

Hippo Education
By Hippo Education
on July 28, 2021

Resume Writing Tips and Tricks 

You’re about to graduate from PA school and enter the job market. Congratulations! Time to craft your resume, a rite of passage as a professional. Maybe you’ll dust off those cobwebs from an old resume, or create a new one from scratch. But where do you start? Googling “How to write a resume” will return an endless number of (maybe helpful) results. But, if you’re anything like me, I still had questions like, “Do I include my previous job experience, like before PA school?” or “Do I include my clinical rotations?” I was fortunate to have a wonderful staff member at my PA program that helped me write my first professional resume. So, let me pay it forward to you all.

Hippo Education
By Hippo Education
on July 19, 2021
Job Interviews

If you’ve listened to our audio series, you’ll know there are several things that make my palms start to sweat. Presentations on rounds. The first day of a new clinical rotation. Mariachi bands. Well, here’s another one: job interviews.

Hippo Education
By Hippo Education
on June 21, 2021

Carbon Health’s growth is off the charts—they are adding 60 new urgent care clinics this year, with projected five-year growth of 5,900%. Roger Wu, Medical Director at Carbon Health, discusses how a key to the organization’s success is Carbon’s commitment to clinician education and career development. Through a partnership with Hippo Education, Carbon’s culture of lifelong learning has fostered a clinician retention rate of 95% that continues to fuel their success.

Hippo Education
By Hippo Education
on June 21, 2021

Urgent care centers represent a vital component of the American health care system, as evidenced by their rapid growth over the last decade and urgent care’s role during the COVID-19 pandemic; but demand for urgent care services has highlighted a need for focused education for the clinicians practicing in this nuanced environment. By equipping clinicians with specialized urgent care education, urgent care centers can better support their teams and improve patient outcomes.

By Aaron Bright
on June 21, 2021

Staying educated is different before and after training

My specialty is Emergency Medicine but I think the following sentiment applies to all clinicians: doctors, PAs, NPs, nurses, techs… the whole team.

Do you remember, in school or in residency, when you made a great diagnosis, did some cool procedure, or saved the day in some way? What happened next? High fives all around, proud mentors, stories at rounds, teaching peers how you did it, drinks after work… good times.

Hippo Education
By Hippo Education
on June 21, 2021
Tips for Preparing Clinicians for Urgent Care

With clinicians from different specialties and experience levels, onboarding for urgent care can be challenging. These tips will help you prepare your clinicians for the urgent care setting, so they’re equipped and confident from day one.

By Aaron Bright
on January 06, 2021

Hello.

I’m a thinker. I don’t mean in the Socrates kind of way. I just mean that if you present me with a new problem my brain tends to go deep on it right away. I start thinking of nuance and options and outcomes and before I know it I’m underwater in data and ideas. This can be paralyzing for me if I don’t get back to the surface. See for reference: choosing a medical school, deciding to leave community practice for academics, and whether to get that full-back unicorn tattoo.

By Aaron Bright
on July 17, 2020

A memory keeps popping up which is pretty shameful but does not have a disaster ending.

By Aaron Bright
on February 10, 2020

With the help of the Hippo team I started a monthly(ish) newsletter. If you’re a medical practitioner please check it out. I hope to bring some good stuff for you each month.

By Aaron Bright
on January 15, 2020

Wine and chocolate are great and horrible

I’ve had a personal morbid fascination with the medical literature since medical school. I’ve lived long enough to see several things be portrayed in the professional and layperson literature as miraculously beneficial treatments only to be the polar opposite in the next study or after failing to be replicable long term. It’s nuts. I’m not a statistician but I’ve been trying to become more facile with statistics (I highly recommend this amazing little book) and especially the many kinds of bias that can influence the “conclusions” of studies.

By Aaron Bright
on January 11, 2020
The good physician knows his patient through and through, and his knowledge is bought dearly. Time, sympathy, and understanding must be lavishly dispensed, but the reward is to be found in that personal bond which forms the greatest satisfaction of the practice of medicine. One of the essential qualities of the clinician is his interest in humanity, for the secret of the care of the patient is in caring for the patient.” -Dr. Francis Weld Peabody, 1927

The Hippo Education crew took a well-deserved retreat to New Orleans this past week. As a remote company we treasure the opportunity to come together IRL. The company was wonderful, the city fascinating, and the beignets plentiful.

By Aaron Bright
on November 03, 2019

I have had a task on my to-do list for forever, inspired by all kinds of deep people, to write thank you notes to people who had a profound impact on my life. I don’t know why I never get to it. But, the other day I did one. I happened upon the email address of a doctor named Rinaldo Canalis. I’d been looking for a place to send him a note that wouldn’t get thrown away (like a hospital address might) for years.

By Aaron Bright
on October 21, 2019

I use this meditation app called Waking Up by Sam Harris (we are in no way affiliated). Today someone asked me, what is the most important app on my phone (an existential question?). Waking Up might be it. There are lots of other good meditation apps.

By Aaron Bright
on October 15, 2019

A few weeks ago I woke up with that strange feeling of health and energy that comes from the absence of discomfort. After an epic 10 day trip to Indonesia focused on surfing in an environment at times paradise-like and at times very polluted, I got slapped down for a week or so by a combination of jet lag and some sort of severely crampy GI bug. The first morning I woke up not feeling horrible, felt amazing.

By Aaron Bright
on October 14, 2019

(If you happened upon this post without reading Part 1, do that first.)

By Aaron Bright
on October 07, 2019

I am Aaron Bright and I am an emergency physician and the CEO and founder of Hippo Education. You can find out a little more about me here.